What we grow

Purslane

IN SEASON - June-November

Purslane is an edible, low-growing succulent plant with thick, rosy stems. Nutritionists champion both its stems and fleshy leaves, which contain more omega-3 fatty acids than any other green plant. Purslane leaves are crunchy, tangy, and slightly peppery, like a juicier version of watercress.

STORAGE TIPS

Store in a tightly sealed bag in the veggie drawer of your refrigerator. 

CULINARY TIPS

Use the leaves and tender top parts of the stem in salads or you can gently saute. 

RECIPES

+Coming soon

Romanesco Cauliflower

IN SEASON - October, November

Romanesco cauliflower, also known as Romanesque broccoli or simply as Romanesco, is an edible flower bud of the species Brassica oleracea. First documented in Italy, it is light green in color. Romanesco has a striking appearance because its form is a natural approximation of a fractal. When compared to a traditional cauliflower, its texture as a vegetable is far more crunchy, and its flavour is not as assertive, being delicate and nutty.

STORAGE TIPS

Store in a tightly sealed bag in the veggie drawer of your refrigerator.  Eat your Romanesco as soon as possible, because nutrient content and taste quickly deteriorate, but it will keep for up to a week.

CULINARY TIPS

Cook it briefly to emphasize the grassy, vegetal aspects of its flavor; cook it longer and a subtle, earthy sweetness emerges.  The taste is milder and sweeter than that of white cauliflower.  Can be eaten raw in a salad, steamed, roasted, or boiled.

RECIPES

+Romanesco Broccoli/Cauliflower Recipes

Shallots

IN SEASON - July, August, September, October

A member of the onion family, but formed more like garlic than onions. Shallots are favored for their mild onion flavor, and can be used in the same manner as onions. A shallot looks like a small, elongated onion with a copper, reddish, or gray skin. When peeled, shallots separate into into cloves like garlic.

STORAGE TIPS

Store shallots in a cool, dry, well-ventilated place for a month or more. Fresh shallots should be refrigerated up to one week.

CULINARY TIPS

Shallots work particularly well in dishes using wine.  Although shallots carmelize like onions, it is important to saute them gently.  Browning over high heat is likely to turn them bitter, much like garlic.  You can roast shallots in their skins until soft.  Then peel, puree and use as a flavoring for soups or sauces. Shallots do not give bad breath like garlic or onions, and are more easily digestible.

RECIPES

+ Shallot Recipes

Radish - Watermelon

IN SEASON - November & Winter Storage

The Watermelon radish, also known as Rooseheart or Red Meat, is an heirloom Chinese Daikon radish. It is a member of the Brassica (mustard) family along with arugula, broccoli and turnips.

Watermelon radishes are edible globular roots attached to thin stems and wavy green leaves. Their exteriors are creamy white with pale green shoulders, a sign of the chlorophyll it received from exposure to the sun. Watermelon radish flesh is white closest to the exterior and becomes bright, circular striations of pink and magenta toward the center. Hence, the watermelon reference.

STORAGE TIPS

Store them in a plastic bag or container in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator for up to a few weeks.

CULINARY TIPS

Watermelon radishes are crisp and firm with a mild taste that is a nice combination of peppery and sweet. They can be eaten raw, roasted, or mashed like a rutabaga.  Also, they do not need to be peeled, just washed well.

RECIPES

+ Watermelon Radish Recipes

Basil

IN SEASON - July, August, September

It is the leaves of the basil plant that are used in cooking, and these leaves can range from green to reddish to purple in color, depending on the variety. There are more than 60 different varieties of basil, each with its own distinct flavor.

STORAGE TIPS

With stalks attached, place in a glass of water and cover with a plastic bag secured to the glass. Store in the refrigerator, changing water daily, and use within a week. Do not wash the leaves until you are ready to use them.

Fresh basil is a perfect candidate for freezing, either whole or chopped. Blanch whole leaves for two seconds, plunge into ice water, pat dry and place in airtight bags in the freezer. The flavor will be stronger if you do not thaw before using.

Another option is to put whole or chopped fresh leaves in an ice cube tray and cover with water or broth before freezing. Once frozen, pop the cubes out into an airtight bag. Use the cubes in soups, stews or sauces.

Basil and oil paste may also be frozen. Frozen basil should be used within 4 months.

Fresh basil may also be dry-preserved. Gently wash the leaves, blot with paper towels, and let them dry completely. Layer coarse salt and basil leaves, ending with a layer of salt, in an airtight container. Store in a cool, dark place up to 6 months.

CULINARY TIPS

Basil is the ultimate compliment to tomatoes and also pairs beautifully with onions, garlic, and olives. For the most intense flavor, basil should be added at the end of the cooking process. 

RECIPES

+ Basil Recipes

Photo: Johnny's Selected Seeds

Photo: Johnny's Selected Seeds

Cilantro

IN SEASON - July, August, September

STORAGE TIPS

Cilantro should be stored in a bag in the fridge or with the stems in a jar of water (bouquet-style) in the fridge. 

CULINARY TIPS

When adding cilantro to a hot dish, add at the last minute to get full benefit of the flavor.

RECIPES

+ Cilantro Recipes

 

Photo: Johnny's Selected Seeds

Photo: Johnny's Selected Seeds

Mustard Greens

IN SEASON - June, September, October

Peppery, crispy mustard greens, also known as leaf mustard, is indeed one of the most nutritious green-leafy vegetables available around. Its lovely top greens have actually more vitamin A, carotenes, vitamin K, and flavonoid anti-oxidants than some of commonly consumed fruits and vegetables.

This crispy leafy green is obtained from mustard plant belonging to the Brassica family, which also includes cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts, etc. Scientific name: Brassica juncea.

STORAGE TIPS

Mustard Greens can be stored in a bag in the fridge for up to a week.

CULINARY TIPS

Add mustard greens to your salad for a lively, peppery accent. You can saute them, but they can also be boiled or braised. Short cooking is the best way to preserve the flavor and texture of mustard greens. Overcooking will cause greens to become soft and mushy.

RECIPES

+ Mustard Greens Recipes

Dandelion Greens

IN SEASON - June

Dandelions are nature's richest green vegetable source of beta-carotene, from which Vitamin A is created, and the third richest source of Vitamin A of all foods, after cod-liver oil and beef liver! They also are particularly rich in fiber, potassium, iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and the B vitamins, thiamine and riboflavin, and are a good source of protein.

These figures represent only those published by the USDA. Studies in Russia and Eastern Europe by Gerasimova, Racz, Vogel, and Marei (Hobbs 1985) indicate that dandelion is also rich in micronutrients such as copper, cobalt, zinc, boron, and molybdenum, as well as Vitamin D.

STORAGE TIPS

Dandelion greens can be stored in a bag in the fridge for up to a week.

CULINARY TIPS

Cooking dandelion greens makes them less bitter. They are good sauted or tossed with pasta or potatoes or added to quiches. They make a great addition to soups and stews. To soften dandelion green's bitterness, pair them with sweet flavors, like balsamic vinegar or honey; spicy flavors, like garlic, chile, pepper, or onion.

RECIPES

+ Dandelion Greens Recipes

Photo: Johnny's Selected Seeds

Photo: Johnny's Selected Seeds

Winter Squash

IN SEASON - September, October, November

Winter squash, members of the Cucurbitaceae family and relatives of both the melon and the cucumber, come in many different varieties. While each type varies in shape, color, size and flavor, they all have hard protective skins that are difficult to pierce that gives them a long storage life of up to six months and a hollow inner seed containing cavity. 

We grow Butternut, Sunshine, Acorn, Buttercup & Sweet Dumpling Varieties.

STORAGE TIPS

Winter squash should be stored at room temperature - and dry. Keep in paper bags or baskets out of direct sunlight and they will last months.

CULINARY TIPS

Working with squash is one time you will want a big, heavy chef's knife or cleaver.  First, cut off the stem and then insert the point into the squash and press down hard to plunge it in. Pull the knife toward you and then away in a rocking motion. You can also bake your squash whole, then halve it and remove the seeds, and scoop out the flesh once it's softened up a bit.

RECIPES

+ Winter Squash Recipes

Tomatoes

IN SEASON - August, September,October

Tomatoes have fleshy internal segments filled with slippery seeds surrounded by a watery matrix. They can be red, yellow, orange, green, purple, or brown in color. Although tomatoes are fruits in a botanical sense, they don't have the dessert quality sweetness of other fruits. Instead they have a subtle sweetness that is complemented by a slightly bitter and acidic taste. Cooking tempers the acid and bitter qualities in tomatoes and brings out their warm, rich, sweetness. 

We grow a wide variety of beefsteak, heirloom, and cherry tomato varieties.  

STORAGE TIPS

Tomatoes should never be refrigerated until they (1) have been cooked, (2) have been cut or put into a raw dish like a salsa, or (3) are fully ripe and would spoil if left further at room temperature. Place tomatoes stem end up, and don't put them on a sunny windowsill to hasten ripening. Instead, put tomatoes in a sealed paper bag with or without ethylene-producing fruit such as bananas. Ripe tomatoes will hold at room temperature for two or three days. Ripe tomatoes you've refrigerated to keep from spoiling will taste better if you bring them to room temperature before eating.

CULINARY TIPS

A good serrated knife is far superior to a flat edged knife for slicing tomatoes. Avoid cooking tomatoes in aluminum pots, as the tomato will develop an unpleasant metal taste.

RECIPES

 + Tomato Recipes

Sweet Potatoes

IN SEASON - October, November

The sweet potato has yellow or orange flesh, and its thin skin may either be white, yellow, orange, red or purple. Sometimes this root vegetable will be shaped like a potato, being short and blocky with rounded ends, while other times it will be longer with tapered ends. There is often much confusion between sweet potatoes and yams; the moist-fleshed, orange-colored root vegetable that is often called a "yam" is actually a sweet potato. 

STORAGE TIPS

Store Sweet Potatoes between 55°F and 65°F in a dark, dry, cool place, for up to one month, or use within one week if stored at room temperature. If refrigerated, their natural sugar will turn to starch and ruin the flavor.

CULINARY TIPS

If you steam your sweet potatoes whole or in chunks, this cuts down on the cooking time. Baking in the oven usually takes an hour or more. Remember not to refrigerate them, and scrub them just before cooking and be sure to enjoy the skins.

RECIPES

+ Sweet Potato Recipes

Summer Squash & Zucchini

IN SEASON - July, August, September

Summer Squash/Zucchini are harvested when immature (while the rind is still tender and edible). 

STORAGE TIPS

Store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to one week.  The bag should be perforated or loosely tied not sealed tightly.

CULINARY TIPS

There is no need to peel or seed your zucchini. Zucchini can be eaten raw in salads. If you are cooking zucchini, slice it and salt it to draw out some of the water, then cook quickly over dry, high heat to caramelize the flesh before it has a chance to steam and get soggy. Dry heat cooking generally suits zucchini best.

RECIPES

+ Zucchini Recipes

 

Rutabaga

IN SEASON - November

The rutabaga, swede (from Swedish turnip), or yellow turnip (Brassica napobrassica) is a root vegetable that originated as a cross between the cabbage and the turnip.

STORAGE TIPS

Store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to three weeks.

CULINARY TIPS

Prepare by using a pairing knife or vegetable peeler to remove the outer layer. Cut off very bottom so that you will have a flat surface for chopping. Use large chef's knife to halve then quarter your rutabaga. Boiling or mashing makes a great side dish!

RECIPES

+ Rutabaga Recipes

Potatoes

IN SEASON - July, August, September, October, November

The potato belongs to the Solanaceae or nightshade family whose other members include tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, and tomatillos. They are the swollen portion of the underground stem which is called a tuber and is designed to provide food for the green leafy portion of the plant. We grow many different varieties of potatoes, including Keuka Gold, Red, Purple, Yukon Gold, Fingerling, and more!

STORAGE TIPS

Potatoes like cool (45°F to 50°F) humid (but not wet) surroundings, but refrigeration can turn the starch in the potatoes to sugar and may tend to darken them when cooked. Store in burlap, brown paper, or perforated plastic bags away from light, in the coolest, non-refrigerated, and well-ventilated part of the house. Under ideal conditions they can last up to three months this way, but more realistically, figure three to five weeks. New potatoes should be used within one week of purchase. Don't store onions and potatoes together, as the gases they each give off, will cause the other to decay.

CULINARY TIPS

When baking, you can stand potatoes on end in muffin tins if you're baking several. Bake extra and use for hash browns the next day! Keep in mind, to preserve the abundance of nutrients in your potatoes, cook them in their skins. Steam instead of boiling, as water naturally leaches some of the nutrients from food cooked in it.

RECIPES

+ Potato Recipes

Peppers

IN SEASON - August, September, October

Sweet peppers are plump, bell-shaped vegetables featuring either three or four lobes. They usually range in size from 2 to 5 inches in diameter, and 2 to 6 inches in length. Inside the thick flesh is an inner cavity with edible bitter seeds and a white spongy core. Bell peppers are not 'hot'. They contain a recessive gene that eliminates capsaicin, the compound responsible for the 'hotness' found in other peppers. We grow green bell peppers, that if left on the plant, will turn yellow and then red. 

STORAGE TIPS

Peppers like cool not cold temperatures, ideally about 45°F to 50°F with good humidity. Peppers are ethylene sensitive, so they should not be stored near ethylene-producing food such as pears or apples. Put peppers in plastic bags and they will keep up to five days in the refrigerator. Green peppers will keep slightly longer than the other, more ripe, varieties.

CULINARY TIPS

Green peppers tend to have a green-as in unripe-flavor that many people don't care for, but the yellow, red, and orange peppers can be very sweet. When slicing large peppers, cut them open first and then slice them with the inside of the pepper facing your knife. The inside of the pepper is not slick and grabs willingly and less dangerously.

RECIPES

+ Sweet Pepper Recipes

Parsnip

IN SEASON - November

The parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) is a root vegetable related to the carrot. Parsnips resemble carrots, but are paler than most of them and have a stronger flavor. Like carrots, parsnips are native to Eurasia and have been eaten there since ancient times. 

STORAGE TIPS

Trim off any green tops and refrigerate the roots for up to three weeks., storing in a perforated plastic bag to retain moisture. 

CULINARY TIPS

Most of the flavor in parsnips is right below the skin so rather than peel too much of the outer layer , you can just give them a good scrubbing.  You can roast, bake, broil, mash them or even puree them into a soup. Small, tender parsnips may be peeled and grated raw into salads.

RECIPES

Coming soon.

Photo: Johnny's Selected Seeds

Photo: Johnny's Selected Seeds

Onions

IN SEASON - July, August, September, October

The word onion comes from the Latin word unio for "single," or "one," because the onion plant produces a single bulb, unlike its cousin, the garlic, that produces many small bulbs. The name also describes the union (also from unio) of the many separate, concentrically arranged layers of the onion. We grow several different varieties of onions, including Walla Walla, yellow, and red.

STORAGE TIPS

Store in a cool, dry, well ventilated place, in single layers. If the onions at home show signs of sprouting, cut away the sprouts and use them immediately. Use fresh onions (like Walla Walla) within a week. Chopped or sliced ions can be stored in a sealed container for 7-10 days in your refrigerator.

CULINARY TIPS

Don't want to cry? Refrigerate onions 30 minutes before preparation to prevent tearing, or light a candle by your cutting board. To remove the smell of onions rub hands and equipment with lemon juice or salt. When cooking, high heat makes onions turn bitter, so always use low or medium heat.

RECIPES

+ Onion Recipes

Melons

IN SEASON - August, September

We grow several varieties of melons, including musk melons, cantaloupe melons, and watermelons. 

STORAGE TIPS

Can be kept on the counter until ripe, then immediately refrigerated until ready to eat! Our melons are usually ripe right off the vine, so you can put them straight in the fridge when you get them home.

CULINARY TIPS

Keep in mind how wonderful melons are in a salad! Mix your cool sweet melon with some delicious fresh greens and cheese--Yum!

RECIPES

Coming soon.

Leeks

IN SEASON - October, November

Leeks are related to onions, shallots and scallions to which they bear a resemblance. They look like large scallions having a very small bulb and a long white cylindrical stalk of superimposed layers that flows into green, tightly wrapped, flat leaves. 

STORAGE TIPS

Keep leeks refrigerated for up to one week in your crisper drawer. 

CULINARY TIPS

When preparing, trim white part and discard greens. Leeks can be quite sandy, so careful washing is important.

RECIPES

+ Leek Recipes

Green Beans

IN SEASON - July, August, September

Green beans are picked while still immature and the inner bean is just beginning to form. They are one of only a few varieties of beans that are eaten fresh. Although green beans vary in size they average about four inches in length. They are usually deep emerald green in color and come to a slight point at either end. They contain tiny seeds within their thin pods. The whole bean is edible- pod & seeds!

STORAGE TIPS

Place green beans in a perforated plastic bag and store them in the refrigerator crisper. Although they will keep longer, up to 5 days, enjoy them within 2-3 days.

CULINARY TIPS

You can steam, boil, or saute--my favorite is steamed for 5-10 minutes add a little butter and parmesean cheese, or chill them after you steam them and put them in your salad.

RECIPES

+ Green Bean Recipes